Menu
close play
Home Page

The Big Walk at Holy Family

The Big Walk at Holy Family

 

During this half term, the children and teachers at Holy Family participated in a Walk to Refuge event in recognition of refugees all over the world. Our significant focus came from the Walk with Amal project where a 3.5 meter tall puppet travelled 8,000 km and through 8 countries!

 

The walk consisted of walking 2 laps of the Holy Family playing fields, roughly equating to 1km. During the time, the children reflected on what it must be like to walk 8000km without adequate clothing, food or knowing where they would end up. Each Year group reflected on different aspects of the journey so that they would be able to contextualise the plight of refugees.

 

Year 1

 ‘I would feel lonely. If I was a refugee, I’d be terrified, especially if I didn’t know where my parents were or if they were safe.’

 

Children were encouraged to ask questions relating to the journey. Questions such as ‘Why do people need to flee their own country?’ and simple ones such as ‘What are they going to eat?’ were raised and discussed.

 

Year 2

‘If I was a refugee, I’d feel confused because I am leaving my own country and even my family but I need safety.’

 

The children were able to contextualise how exhausting walking so far must be. They spoke about the weather and how not having much food would make the journey even more difficult.

 

Year 3

‘I felt terrible knowing that they have to walk a long way to be safe and how uncomfortable the journey would have been for them.’

 

The importance of a warm, safe shelter to remain healthy was the aspect that the children in Year 3 grappled with. The children contextualised feeling hungry and thirsty, during this short walk and imagined how the children and families would feel on their very long journeys.

 

Year 4

‘I feel sorry for these people because they have to leave their own country and going somewhere new can be lonely and scary.’

The aspect of feeling lonely and being a stranger in a foreign country was explored and the children discussed how they could help make refugees feel welcome.

 

 

Year 5

‘I want to make refugees feel welcome. Maybe I could learn some parts of their language so that it shows I care about who they are and where they’re from.’

 

When asked about how they would manage at a new school, particularly if they couldn’t understand English, the children were able to contextualise how difficult it must be starting life over in a foreign country. Children mentioned that they had a new respect for people who could speak multiple languages.

 

Year 6

‘People might be annoyed and angry at being forced to leave their homes and countries. Having to move because of things beyond your control is difficult. They must have lost so much and to have to seek that in another place is tough. It takes a long time for a place to feel like home.’

 

Children discussed what conflict was. They were able to make links with why some people have no choice but to leave their homes and seek refuge and why so many people want to seek refuge in Europe.

Our wider partnership school family has also been walking and reflecting upon the journeys those seeking sanctuary face. This has sparked curiosity to find out whether we have collaboratively reached a distance similar to Amal. We discovered that as a partnership that we have covered a distance of 1,377km. This is under a ¼ of Amal’s brave journey.

  • OLSJ 97 children = 97km
  • Sinclair 210 children = 210km
  • Mansel Park 420 children =420km
  • Holy Family 420 children =420km
  • Bitterne Park 630 children =630km

 

You can find more about Amal’s walk here: https://www.walkwithamal.org/

Top